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Tailor Store goes 100% CO2 neutral

This is how we think - if all businesses were to become carbon-neutral, we could build an environmentally sustainable society together. We at Tailor Store are taking an important step in that direction now by compensating for our entire carbon dioxide emission through reforestation of rain forest in Sri Lanka.

With the help of external expertise, Cambridge Partners and Satis Arnold, we have defined our carbon footprint including everything from production of fabrics, production of garments, transport of raw materials and finished goods and it adds up to 1146 tonnes of CO2 in 2012. Our footprint assessment will be updated annually, and we will fully offset these emissions by reforestation of rainforests in southern Sri Lanka in an area adjoining the world heritage Sinharaja and Kanneliya protected forests. For the purchase of the VER (voluntary emission rights) and the actual execution of the reforestation, we co-operate with Conservation Carbon Company in Melbourne, Australia, and its Sri Lankan country partner Rainforest Rescue International in Galle. Since the offset programme is intended to last over a long period of time, both CCC and RRI are committed to not only plant trees but also look after and maintain the forest in the future.

The reforestation will be conducted according to the principles of analog forestry. We will only replant naturally occurring, threatened and endemic species that are locally appropriate. Designs for watershed management and biodiversity conservation, including habitat enhancement through linking of areas of reforestation with existing rain forests, will be implemented as well.

The first symbolic trees were planted by Jan Höjman, CEO, and Nalin Pathirana, Managing Director, in August 2012 (Picture 1). During autumn 2012, the site for reforestation will be prepared for many more trees to be planted as the monsoon period arrives in November (Picture 2).

We will keep this page regularly updated with information and pictures regarding the carbon offset project. You can also read more about our CSR activities on Facebook.

First tree planted

View of Sinharja rainforest

November 2013

6000 trees planted - Tailor Store is 100% carbon neutral

Challenges are there to be overcome. With some delays, due to difficult weather conditions and heavy rains, we are now definately 100% carbon neutral. Needless to say we feel very good about this. 6000 trees have been planted in “our” rainforest in Sri Lanka. The trees need maintanance and protection to ensure that they survive the first critical years. This task is handled by Rainforest Rescue International Rainforest Rescue International Their man in the field is Mr. Gunasekara who is living close to the forest. His assignment is to monitor and guard the plants and clear the ground until the trees have grown big enough to establish a natural balance in line with the principles of analog forestry. This project contributes to offset the greenhouse gases and to build a sustainable world. We will regularaly visit the rainforest and publish updates on our wesite as well as on Facebook.

Last tree planted

To the left: Mr. Nalin, Managing Director of Tailor Store International, proudly looking at one of the last trees planted to complete the rainforest project.

To the right: A Hal tree that within a few years will grow big and lock in several tons of carbon.




April 2013

Delay in the rain forest

Sometimes, things do not turn out exactly as they were intended. Sadly, we have been delayed with the planting of our rain forest in Sri Lanka. First of all, it has been more difficult than expected to clean up and prepare the soil for new plants. Furthermore, it has been unusually dry over the last few months, which required us to build a watering system for the newly planted trees. Because of a misunderstanding in communication with our local partners in Sri Lanka, we were convinced that the schedule was being followed, and all plants were in the ground by January as planned. This incorrect information was sadly stated on our website as well as on Facebook in February. We are truly sorry that false information was spread.

So here are the facts as of April 2013. 2,484 tree seedlings are in the ground. The soil is being prepared for the planting of 3,500 more plants, and according to the latest information we received from our partners, we plan to be finished with the planting in early June 2013. How fast work can be continued after that, is to some extent dependent on the weather and how much rain falls during the month of May. Further information regarding the state of the planting will be posted on our website as well as facebook.

First tree planted Map over Southern Sri Lanka showing our rain forest planted in Ambalegedra, Tawalama district 6° 23' 07.00'' N, 80° 20' 45.00'' E


First tree planted The white line shows the zone where our rain forest is being planted. The vegetation shown on the image is lower shrubbery which has to be cleaned almost completely in order to give room for trees that are going to be planted


The planting of rain forest is an exciting project. For those of you who want more details, here is a list of the trees planted so far. The planting is done according to the principles of analog forestry which implies that only endemic species are planted, and a well-conceived plan on how the trees have to placed for the forest to grow strong in a natural way has been developed. The trees are planted to form different height layers that protect each other and make the trees grow strong and viable.

Name Botanical namn Canopy layer Amount of plants
Atteriya Orange jasine Sub canopy 19
Atamba Mangifera zeylanica   140
Badulla Semecarpus spp Canopy 20
Bambara ( Vine )     74
Bata domba Syzygium operculatum Sub canopy 104
Bedidel Artocarpus nobilis Canopy 135
Bombu Symplocos cochinchinensis Sub canopy 118
Bomiriya   Sub canopy 20
Bulu Terminalia beralica Canopy 13
Burutha Chloroxyclon swietenia Canopy 13
Dawata Carallia brachiata Sub canopy 207
Dodamkaha   Sub canopy 23
Domba Calophyllum inophyllum Canopy 51
Godapara Dillenia retusa Sub canopy 4
Gal veralu Elaeocarpus subvillosus Understory 14
Hal Veteria copallifera Canopy 46
Himbutu ( Vine ) Salacia prinoid   24
Hora Dipterocarpus zeylanicus Emergent 156
Hurulla     22
Indi     20
Jak Artocarpus hetarophyllus Canopy 44
Kekiriwara Schumacheria castaneifolia Understory 323
Kirihembiliya Palaquium canaliculatum Canopy 13
Kithul Caryota urens   22
Madatiya Adenanthera pavonina Canopy 31
Mahajambu   Sub canopy 11
Mango Mangifera indica Canopy 72
Mee Madhuca longifolia Canopy 9
Mendora Stemonocarpus petiolaris Canopy 22
Milla Vitex altissima Canopy 22
Mora Dimocarpus longan Canopy 101
Munamal Mimusops elengi Canopy 23
Na Mesua nagassarium Canopy 18
Otha     14
Panukera Syzygium neesianum Sub canopy 10
Pawatta Tusticia adhatoda Understory 21
Pelen Bhesa ceylanica Canopy 146
Rambutan Nephelium lappaceum Canopy 30
Ruk Horsfieldia iryaghedhi Canopy 112
Sudubambara ( Vine ) Dalbergia pseudo-sissoo   12
Thiniyadun Shorea trapezifolia Emergent 7
Uguduhal Symplocos coronata Sub canopy 9
Uru honda Urandra apicalis Sub canopy 2
Wal uguressa   Sub canopy 6
Walu kina Calophullum bracteatum Subcanopy 65
Wal waraka   Sub canopy 83
Welwat apple   Canopy 17
Weniwel Coscinium fenestratum Vine 16


Below there are some images of trees that have been planted so far.

Plants






First tree planted 1. This picture shows product manager Louise planting a tree together with Mr Gunasekara.
2. The project's team (from left to right): Ruwan, Satis, Louise, Jan, Isuru, Charith, Head Priest Ambelegedara and Gunasekara

January 2013

The rainforest is growing

Last November, we took the next big step in our CO2-compensation project and planted about 6000 plants. The growing of these plants took about two months, and by the end of January, we had all the trees planted in the soil. When we were in Tawalama and helped planting the forest back in November, we talked a lot to the members of the project team. It was interesting to hear how the experts of Rainforest Rescue International resonated when planting the trees. They stated that the allocation of the different types of trees is a crucial factor because the trees will grow into different heights which will have them protect each other and help the forest to grow strong. We met Mr Gunasekara, who lives close to "our" forest, and will be the person to nurse and take care of it during the next years. His work includes watching the plants and helping them to grow fine in the future as well.

Beside Mr Gunasekara, we also met the project leader of RRI, Mr Ruwan, as well as a monk who lives directly next to the forest. The monk, Head Priest Ambelegedara, showed a large interest and commitment to our forest growing strong, not only because of it absorbing carbon dioxide but also being a natural habitat for animals and plants to develop and live in. Being at the site and helping to plant the trees ourselves together with our local partners driving the project was an impressive and positive experience. Their knowledge and experience shows in their commitment to sustainability in general as well as to this local rainforest in particular.